Category Archives: Thing 9

Thing #8 & #9 : Wrap up

Thanks all for participating. it’s nice to see Doraemon also using QR code. ^_-)

We also switched from our usual hangout at twitter to Facebook group. Please click “NEXT PAGE” to see all 221 conversations.

Screen Shot 2014-03-23 at 1.26.24 am Continue reading Thing #8 & #9 : Wrap up

Thing 9 : QR Code

Do click all tabs (Discover, Explore, and Activities) to get to the end of the lesson.


Discover


What is QR Code?

QR is an abbreviation for Quick Response, and is used very commonly (at least in Singapore) in many publicity media, primarily for the convenience of linking to physical and online content. It looks like a dot-matrix box like design (see below) :-

MyQR1

History of QR Codes

QR Codes were originally invented in 1994 by Denso Wave, a Japanese company that is a subsidiary of Toyota Motor Corporation in their quest to track car parts during the automotive assembly process (“QR Code”, 2013). They are 2 dimensional barcodes that provide substantially more flexibility than standard barcodes. Standard barcodes can only contain 20 alpha-numeric characters (Struyk, 2012). QR Codes can contain 7,089 numeric or 4,296 alphanumeric characters, including non-alphabet characters, such as Japanese and Chinese characters (Gazin, 2011) . This provides much greater flexibility. QR codes can also be linked to websites, e-text, online images, videos, audio files, sign-up forms, telephone numbers–the possibilities are endless!

Here’s a great video introduction to QR Codes:

Some examples of QR Code Applications

References
Gazin, G. (2011, June 21). A QR code tells a much story than a barcode. Troy Media. Retrieved from http://www.troymedia.com/2011/06/21/a-qr-code-tells-a-much-bigger-story-than-a-barcode/

QR Code. (2013). In Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1822984/QR-Code

Struyk, T. (2012). Introduction to QR Codes. Retrieved from http://www.techopedia.com/2/27408/trends/an-introduction-to-qr-codes


Explore



Reading QR Codes

Find an app for your mobile device to read QR codes (eg. QR Code Readers, QR Droid Zapper (Android and iOS options), Bako.do (iOS) and kwiQR (windows) )

Creating QR Codes

The QR Code under “Discover” tab was generated with an Android App – BeautyQR. There are many tools out there that can help you to generate simple and fancy QR codes free or with a fee like QRStuff (paid version allows you to change URL of created QR Code), QR-Monkey (you can embed a social media icon), or Visualead (free version allows you to create one QR code). URL shortener sites like goo.gl and Bit.ly can also generate QR codes.

For BeautyQR, click on arrow >> to generate QR code. This app is very easy to use and lets you change the color of the QR code and its background, allows you to embed images, etc.

QRCode1 QRCode2

Using goo.gl and Bit.ly not only allows one to generate QR code but also track viewing statistics.

To see the QR Code link to the shortened URL, click “Details” for goo.gl and “view stats” for Bit.ly. For Google, you can adjust the size of the QR code by change the “dimension size” embedded on the URL. The biggest available size is 500 x 500px.

GoogleQR


Activities


  1. Use one of the shared tools under Explore to generate a QR Code linking to your personal profile or your library information
  2. Share the QR code via Twitter or instagram with us
  3. Remember to use the hashtag #23mthingsphsg


Thinking Points


  • Are QR Codes just the latest fad?
  • Do you have any stories of trying out QR codes in your library that either have or haven’t worked?
  • Are QR codes too difficult to scan? What problems have you experienced?
  • How could libraries get more creative with QR codes?
  • What do you think of the ‘QR codes replacing a public library’ concept in Klagenfurt, Austria?
  • QR Code links are just as susceptible to broken links as stand weblinks. Is this a problem?


Remix from the original 23 Mobile things :
23 Mobile Things – Thing 9
ANZ 23 Mobile things – Thing 9

Follow 23mobile things’s board QR codes on Pinterest.


Joan Joan is a Senior Librarian (New Media) at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) and has been in the profession for nearly five years now. Her forte lies in using social media and mobile tools. She graduated with a BSSc from National University of Singapore and holds a Master in Information Studies from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.